Monday, December 2, 2013

Tech Tuesday: Quizlet, Google Forms, and Formative Checks

Last week I sat down with a teacher (Woot, Kallas!) who wanted to use Quizlet with his students to track their vocabulary practice.

Quizlet (http://quizlet.com/) is an online tool similar to Study Blue that allows students to study vocabulary/concepts in a variety of ways, including flash cards, "learn" mode, scatter game, space race, and more. Students can track their own progress. If you create a teacher account and a class, you can see when students have studied particular sets of vocab (but not always see how they scored). Quizlet is available via web browser as well as iOS app and Android apps. Note that some creation features must be done from a browser on a computer or the iPad, not within the app.

This is a really cool tool, especially for world language classes, as the text can be spoken in "Learn" mode and flash card mode. Awesome for pronunciation! You can create a class, and your kids can sign up using their Google account info so they don't need to remember yet another login and password. Bonus!

The Scatter game can be used on your classroom SMARTBoard to reinforce vocab, terms, concepts, dates, and more.

Quizlet is super easy to use and there are tons of help files here that will show you how to get started.

But, how can you use Quizlet and check on how your students are progressing?

This is a good opportunity to use Google Forms! Using a Google Form (that you can embed in Schoology) will allow you to collect feedback from your students on how they're doing in Quizlet, along with some of the metacognitive pieces that we learned about in our assessment literacy training.


You can create a Google Form that would allow you to collect your students' scores (self-reported, so they're on the honor system) and also ask them to evaluate their progress and provide info to you on what they need help with and how they feel about their progress. 

Both the Quizlet and the Google Form can be embedded right into Schoology so kids can go to one place to respond.

Watch this video to see how it's done:




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